News and Events   Foreign Ministry Spokesperson's Remarks   About Us   Visa and Authentication   Overseas Chinese Affairs   China ABC   Business and Scientific Cooperation   Culture, Education and Tourism   Notice 
Home > News and Events
Physicist, architect win top national award

BEIJING, Feb. 14 (Xinhua) -- Two Chinese scientists, physicist Xie Jialin and architect Wu Liangyong, won China's top science-and-technology award Tuesday morning as China held a high-profile annual ceremony to honor excellent scientists and research achievements.

Attended by President Hu Jintao, Premier Wen Jiabao and other senior leaders, the event, staged in the Great Hall of the People, saw the two each conferred the State Top Scientific and Technological Award and awarded 5 million yuan (794,900 U.S.dollars).

President Hu Jintao delivered certificates to the two top scientists, shook hands and congratulated them on their achievements.

Eyeing further innovation-powered development, China has been offering annual awards to elite scientists for 12 consecutive years since 2000, with 20 top award winners including Xie and Wu.

Xie is best known for helping China build its first high-energy electron linac (linear particle accelerator) in 1964 and then the research and design of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider in 1980s, while Wu earned his reputation for developing the science of human settlements in China and combining it with China's urbanization.

Xie Jialin, 91, studied at Yanching University in China and the California Institute of Technology of the United States, and then obtained a Ph.D from Stanford University. He returned to China in 1955.

In his decades of research career, Xie has made outstanding achievements regarding accelerator physics, accelerator technology and free electron laser. He was elected an academic of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1980.

Wu Liangyong, 89, gained a Bachelor's Degree in architecture from National Central University in Chongqing, China in 1944 and then a Master's Degree in architecture and urban design from Cranbrook Academy of Art in the United States five years later.

When he returned to China in 1950, Wu committed himself to city planning, architectural design, landscape planning, as well as teaching and scientific research.

Three scientists from Japan, five from Germany, France, Britain, the United States and Australia won the International Cooperation Award in Science and Technology.

Among the award-winning research projects featuring the event, an original broadband mobile telecommunications transmission technology and an organic light-emitting technology gained first place in the State Technology Invention Award.

Thirty-six projects received second-place prizes of State Natural Sciences Award, but the first-place prize was not awarded for the 8th time in the last 12 years. 

 



[ Suggest To A Friend ]
       [ Print ]